Nurse: Nepal Disaster Area “Uncontrolled Chaos”

KATHMANDU, NEPAL (May 6, 2015) – Nurse Sharon Tissell, a Covenanter volunteering with Medical Teams International in Nepal following the April 28 catastrophic earthquake was writing a report for the organization when the ground began to shake. It was yet another of the many aftershocks of the 7.8-magnitude seismic convulsion that caused people to see whether there will be more landslides, more collapsing buildings around them.

nepal-earthquake-damageMore than 7,000 people have died due to the earthquake. Hundreds of thousands of people were left homeless.

“This disaster, like every other one I have witnessed, is at best uncontrolled chaos,” wrote Tissell, who is the wife of Dwain Tissell, pastor of Eastridge Covenant Church in Clackamas, Oregon. She has been in Nepal for a week.

“The physical, emotional, and psychological impact cannot be overstated,” she wrote.

“The terrain has challenged our team0505 tissell in an effort to mobilize into hard hit area where little or no help has reached,” Tissell wrote. “Some roads are barely passable like the one that took 3 hours to travel 31km. (19 miles). We trek further on foot as needed to reach smaller outposts to treat and assess the condition of the communities, the results of which we will pass on to the relief officials.”

Tissell is expected to return May 20.

Covenant World Relief is partnering with Medical Teams International to provide assistance. A special disaster fund has been established online.

 

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About the Author

Stan Friedman is the news and online editor for the Covenant Companion and is grateful for the opportunity to serve in a job that combines his newspaper and pastoral ministry experience. He has been to 15 Bruce Springsteen concerts in four cities and listened to “Thunder Road” an average of at least once a day for 41 years.

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2 Comments

  1. The Bhutanese refugees who came to Minneapolis from refugee camps in Nepal report that their family members are safe although most of them lost friends or former coworkers they met over the years in Nepal.

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