Five for Friday: Jordan Davis, Covenant History, and Spock

CHICAGO, IL (February 21, 2014) — Many Covenanters routinely share links to social media articles and videos with one another that Covenant News Service believes may be of interest to others. Each Friday we post five of them. Following is a sample of those submissions—their inclusion does not represent an endorsement of any views expressed.

On the Killing of Jordan Davis by Michael Dunn

Enough already! Not another story on race! Those are the cries of the umpteen people who are exasperated by yet another story on the topic. They are the very same cries of people such as Atlantic columnist Ta-Nehisi Coates, who are so angry at having to write those stories – yet again.”

A Sermon: Justice for Jordan Davis

So here’s another one. David Swanson, pastor of New Community Covenant Church in Chicago, had a sermon prepared for this past Sunday, but he scrapped it after hearing that Michael Dunn was not convicted for killing Jordan Davis because the teenager was playing his music too loud. Instead, Swanson pointed to the cross as he addressed the distracted, despairing, and discouraged.

Swede of the Moment

Now this is how history should be taught. If you have trouble deciphering the lyrics, click on “show more.” This was posted in honor of Covenant Founders Day, which was Thursday.

Bigger than Phil: When Did Faith Start to Fade?

“In the past twenty or so years, a tone frankly contemptuous of faith has emerged,” reads the caption under the article’s illustration. But the author points out that the New Atheism really isn’t anything new under the sun. This 4,300-word New Yorker article includes words like “phillipic” (I looked it up, and it has nothing to do with the title) and references to Voltaire, Diderot, Nietzsche, and Mel Brooks—who supplied the reference for the title.

Live Long and Prosper: The Story of Star Trek and the Jewish Priestly Blessing

Who hasn’t tried to make that Vulcan sign at least once? Leonard Nimoy explains the Jewish story behind the hand gesture he made famous through his role as Spock.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *